When words abound: Proverbs 10.19 VOTD

“When words abound, transgression is inevitable, but the one who restrains his words is wise.”

Proverbs 10.19

A person who talks a lot is more prone to use words badly and thereby sin by their use. Though the gospel must be spoken, in daily interactions less is more.

Are you a talker? In what ways do your words tend toward transgression? What bad use do you make of your speech?

#words #speech #VOTD

Poor but wise better: Ecclesiastes 4.13 VOTD

“A poor but wise youth is better than an old and foolish king who no longer knows how to receive advice.”

Ecclesiastes 4.13

Age does not guarantee that one will have wisdom. It can cause one to be set in one’s ways. Rather, one ought to continue to humbly learn. Time in power is not necessarily a virtue.

What matters is not position or possessions, but the acquisition of wisdom. What are you doing to acquire it?

#wisdom #Ecclesiastes #VOTD

No deliverer besides me: Isaiah 43.11 VOTD

“I, I am the Lord, and there is no deliverer besides me.”

Isaiah 43.11

Israel looked to other gods, to other nations, like Egypt to protect them. They failed to trust fully in God. For that failure, they paid dearly.

To what, besides God, do we resort for deliverance? What does it mean to trust God fully?

#God #trust #VOTD

Hugh’s News & Views (Some Great Leaders . . . Pt. 5)

SOME GREAT LEADERS OF THE RESTORATION MOVEMENT

(Part 5)

13. John T. Johnson (1788-1856). The eighth of eleven children, Johnson was born on October 5, 1788 in Scott County, KY at Great Crossings, about three miles west of Georgetown. His father, Robert Johnson, was a colonel in the army and his brother, Richard M. Johnson, would later serve as the ninth vice-president of the United States during the presidency of Martin Van Buren. In 1820 John T. turned his attention toward politics and was elected to serve in the U. S. Congress, and then was re-elected for several terms. In 1821 he joined the Baptist Church in Great Crossings, his home community, but after his retirement from politics in 1830, he became interested in what was derogatorily called “Campbellism” (then sweeping his community) and determined to make a study of it in the light of the Scriptures. He said, “My eyes were opened, and I was made perfectly free by the truth” (John Rogers, The Biography of Elder John T. Johnson [Cincinnati: 1861], p. 21, as cited by Earl West, The Search for the Ancient Order, Vol. 1, p. 234). Johnson immediately set about to convert the Baptist Church at Great Crossings, but did not take into account the power of religious prejudice, though he did baptize his wife, as well as his brother Joel and his wife. With others, he formed a congregation in Great Crossings that worshiped after the New Testament order. Johnson went on to become an extraordinarily successful preacher of the gospel and an ardent advocate of the principles calling for a restoration of the New Testament order. Alexander Campbell said of him, “I wish Kentucky had a few persons equally gifted for taking care of the sheep, as brother Johnson is for marking them and putting them in the green pastures” (a reference to converting people to the right way of the Lord) (The Millennial Harbinger, June 1839, as cited by West, p. 228-229). Samuel Rogers said of him, “As an evangelist, I have thought John T. Johnson the best model I have ever known. Perhaps I ought not to speak of him as a model at all, for no man could imitate him” (as cited by West, p. 229). On the first Sunday evening of December 1856, Johnson preached his last sermon. He developed a case of pneumonia and died in the home of Thomas Bledsoe with whom he was staying in Lexington, KY. When told that death was approaching he said, “I did not think death was so near, but let it come.” In his delirious moments he would quote scripture or preach on the sacrifice of Jesus for sin. On December 18 he closed his eyes in death. Continue reading

#hughfulford, #restoration-movement

I will not be afraid: Hebrews 13.6 VOTD

“So we can say with confidence, ‘The Lord is my helper, and I will not be afraid. What can people do to me?'”

Hebrews 13.6

Such confidence arises from certainty of God’s presence, v. 5. It brings contentment with what we have. We then will not fear any threat that man might pose. The writer quoted Psalm 118.6.

The Bible provides us with teaching about God that gives us faith, certainty, and confidence. Review the place of the Bible in your life history.

#Bible #confidence #VOTD

Lord of all: Romans 10.12 VOTD

“For there is no distinction between the Jew and the Greek, for the same Lord is Lord of all, who richly blesses all who call on him.”

Romans 10.12

Paul argues that Christ brings righteousness to everyone who believes, v. 4. His rich blessings refer to salvation and all that accompanies it. To call upon him is to appeal to God for salvation rather than one’s own righteousness.

Christ is Lord of all, so that means there is one way to be saved, by calling on him. What does this calling entail, according to the Bible?

#Christ as Lord #salvation #calling #VOTD

All that I am: Psalm 62.5 VOTD

“Let all that I am wait quietly before God, for my hope is in him.”

Psalm 62.5 NLT

The Hebrew word for “soul” denotes the whole person. NLT reflects this in the translation above. “In times of stress it may be necessary to command ourselves to do what we know to be true” (J.A. Motyer, 21NBC, 524).

Is there some part of your soul that has not yet learned to wait quietly in God?

#soul #patience #VOTD