Short introduction to Hebrews

In order to encourage unwavering fidelity, Hebrews was written to highlight the supremacy of Jesus Christ.

He is higher than angels (1:2,4). He is the greatest of all high priests, since he serves continually and needs no reconciliation for Himself (2:17; 5:5-7; 7:23,24). He is greater than Moses, who faithfully delivered the Divine will, but didn’t Author it (3:2-6). His sacrificial offering (of Himself) was pristine (7:26,27; 10:14). Hence, His mediatorship is perpetual (7:25), his covenant is perfect, and His promises are greater than those previously received through Moses (8:6-8).

Since these things are so, God’s people should:

  • encourage one another’s obedience, lest we fall short (3:12-13; 4:1,2),
  • approach God’s throne of mercy with hope when we sin, (4:14- 16),
  • exercise our faith regularly (5:12-14), and
  • be diligent to the end (6:11,12).

Chapter 11 is a panorama of persons in the Divine narrative who define biblical faith. “By faith,” each of these committed themselves to acting upon God’s promises and commands without question—even in the face of great adversity. Each of their lives demonstrates the triumph of trust in God’s ultimate will, over the adversity of the present moment.

Chapter 12 is one of the saddest arbitrary divisions in Scripture, leading us to believe, perhaps, that it is disconnected from chapter 11. Not at all; rather, it is the pinnacle. There is no greater hero of faith, no demonstration of ultimate trust, “better” than that of Jesus, the Author and Finisher of our Faith. His faith overthrew death itself, and He rose victoriously to the right hand of the Father, where He sits and waits: on us, and for us (12:1-4).

Rick Kelley, Prestonsburg (Ky) Informer

#hebrews, #nt-introduction