As long as you are with him, 2 Chronicles 15.1-2

“When God’s spirit came upon Azariah, Oded’s son, he confronted Asa: ‘Listen to me, Asa and all Judah and Benjamin,” he said. “The Lord is with you as long as you are with him. If you seek him, he will be found by you; but if you abandon him, he will abandon you.'”

2 Chronicles 15.1-2 CEB

The prophet Azariah stated the basic principle of reform. God treats his people in reciprocal fashion. They will not be blessed by God when they refuse to seek him.

In what way might I not be with God, might I not be seeking him? By failing to listen to some commandment? By not showing the same spirit? By putting my interests first?

#votd #2-Chronicles #reciprocity

Israel had no true God, 2 Chronicles 15.3

“For a long time Israel had no true God, or priest to instruct them, or law.”

2 Chronicles 15.3

This was a perennial problem in Israel. The people followed idolatry, neglected the teachings, and ignored the law. The prophet Azariah urged King Asa to inaugurate reforms.

Congregations can abandon the true God, also. They may lack faithful men to teach. The may ignore God’s commandments. Then it is time for repentance and obedience.

#votd #2-Chronicles #repentance

The Lord got very angry, 2 Chronicles 36.16

“But they mocked God’s messengers, despised his warnings, and ridiculed his prophets. Finally the Lord got very angry at his people and there was no one who could prevent his judgment.”

2 Chronicles 36.16

God felt compassion toward his people and the place of his habitation among them, v. 15. But Israel’s rejection short-circuited his compassion. Jerusalem was destroyed and the people suffered.

People today make fun of the Kingdom’s teachers and evangelistas. They will be judged. Do I speak harshly of those who work in the gospel?

#votd #2-Chronicles #rejection

Stand, 2 Chronicles 34.32

“Further, he made all who were present in Jerusalem and Benjamin stand [with him, in confirmation of it]. So the inhabitants of Jerusalem acted in accordance with the covenant of God, the God of their fathers.”

2 Chronicles 34.32 AMP

King Josiah instituted reforms in Judah. He read the law to the assembly of Israelites, vv. 29-30. He first committed himself to follow the law, v. 31. Then he called upon the people to do so.

Renewal and restoration begins with God’s word and with personal commitment to obey it fully. Then we are in position to make the call to others. Are you ready?

(For more on this verse, see emaildevotionals.com.)

#votd #2-Chronicles #covenant

Did God speak to King Necho of Egypt?

It sure seems like he did. See this passage:

After Josiah had done all this for the temple, King Necho of Egypt marched up to do battle at Carchemish on the Euphrates River. Josiah marched out to oppose him. Necho sent messengers to him, saying, “Why are you opposing me, O king of Judah? I am not attacking you today, but the kingdom with which I am at war. God told me to hurry. Stop opposing God, who is with me, or else he will destroy you.” But Josiah did not turn back from him; he disguised himself for battle. He did not take seriously the words of Necho which he had received from God; he went to fight him in the Plain of Megiddo. 2 Chron 35.20-22

It’s not terribly unusual for God to speak to pagans, even foreign kings. But this is a twist: a foreign king speaking the word of God to a king of Judah. One supposes that if God can make a donkey can speak to a prophet, he can make a pagan king speak to his anointed one.

It could have been through a dream. Apparently, the Chronicler has Spirit inspiration behind him to confirm that it was God who spoke to Necho. But how would Josiah have figured that out? What expectation would he have that this pagan ruler was actually bringing him a revelation from God? It’s a passage that puzzles me.

Got any perspectives on it?

#2-chronicles, #josiah, #revelation