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  • J. Randal Matheny 3:14 pm on 2016-09-07 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: anniversaries, attitude, , ,   

    Another step forward for this 7-year-old effort 

    progress-balloon

    Almost seven years ago, Forthright Press launched The Fellowship Room as a group weblog of saints who could contribute and interact at will. (Here’s the first post.) In that time this modest effort has grown to include more than 11,400 posts by over 30 Fellows over the widest range of topics related to faith and discipleship in a fallen world.

    Today, we take yet another step forward, with a new dot-com domain, which recently became available, and an installation on our own hosting. Several advantages now appear thanks to the move. (More …)

     
  • Ed Boggess 8:39 am on 2015-02-04 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , optimistic,   

    A proverb says, “As a man thinks, so is he.” That means if you think positive thoughts, you are more likely to get positive results and if you think negatively, you are more likely to get negative results. Someone says, “That’s hogwash!” Well, scientists have put it to the test. USA Today reported that MIT researchers found that the attitude a subject took towards a pain-relief pill made a difference in its effectiveness. If the person believed a pill was a new and expensive drug for pain, it was more likely to be effective than if the person thought it was either generic or less expensive. All the pills were identical, only the attitudes were different. This is Just A Minute.

     
  • TFRStaff 8:02 am on 2015-01-25 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , , ,   

    Thinking Work! 

    It has been noted that if one enjoys what they do, they won’t work a day in their life. What is work anyway? Whether we are talking about playing a round of golf or mowing the lawn, have we considered it is the very same muscles that are being used? Also, whether we are working a crossword puzzle or conducting business of some type, the same brain power is being utilized. So, why does what we call “work” seem to tire us more than what we might refer to as “play”? If the same muscles and brain power are put to use it must boil down to attitude and perspective. It would seem that if we could view “work” in the same way we view “play” it could be less wearing on ourselves.

    Now, it also stands to reason that if that which is considered “play” seems to become too much “work” then the pleasure it was intended to provide will be lost. When we maintain a wholesome attitude toward both what might be labeled “work” or “play”, we can experience pleasure in both. It is when we think of it too much as “work” that we begin to struggle. Mark Twain is quoted as stating, “Work is not a concrete thing; it is a mental attitude. Nothing is either work or play but thinking makes it so.”

    Looking at life in a general sense, Solomon stated. . . (More …)

     
  • Eugene Adkins 7:11 am on 2014-08-01 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , ,   

    Some people just never mature 

    I’ve met several Christians throughout the years who are exactly what I try to avoid being – too “smart” for their own good spiritually speaking! Their “Bible knowledge” is so complete they have no room for growth…and it’s a major turn-off to the majority of people around them without them even knowing it, or caring enough to realize it.

    But can’t you know the truth, some may ask? You sure can according to John 8:32! But that knowledge, in its completed form, comes from continuing in the truth – it comes from growing in it (John 8:31; 2 Peter 3:18).

    Does that mean we can never know the complete the truth about a particular topic from day one? Absolutely not. Just think about the nameless eunuch of Ethiopia (Acts 8:35-37). But at the same time remember the growth process that the apostle named Peter of Galilee had to experience concerning the possibility of salvation for gentile people years (literally years) after publicly preaching that the benefits of the gospel would reach “those who were afar off” (Acts 2:38-39; Acts 10).

    My advice, which I strive to remember to follow myself, to anyone who gets asked a Bible-based question from someone who tells you that they’re not trying to be argumentative but simply asking a question that they’re curious about because of a statement or position that you’ve publicly proclaimed is for you to take the question seriously and try to recognize the validity of the point that the question is raising. Phew! Talk about a run-on sentence. But I suppose run-on’s are needed when you talk about a marathon length problem.

    Concerning the sum of the situation, this one thing I have learned: when you are going to ask people to recognize their error you have to be able and willing to do the same with yourself! And the failure to do so reveals a lack of spiritual maturity that becomes obvious to everyone other than the person who stares back at us in the mirror. That’s why we’d all do well to be an Apollos-minded person, and not a Diotrephes.

    Now a certain Jew named Apollos, born at Alexandria, an eloquent man and mighty in the Scriptures, came to Ephesus. This man had been instructed in the way of the Lord; and being fervent in spirit, he spoke and taught accurately the things of the Lord, though he knew only the baptism of John. So he began to speak boldly in the synagogue. When Aquila and Priscilla heard him, they took him aside and explained to him the way of God more accurately.” (Acts 18:24-26)

     
    • Jack Wirtz 2:48 pm on 2014-08-02 Permalink | Reply

      It is customary among many evangelists to began their lessons by stating something similar to, “We do our best to teach and practice what has been given to us by the inspired writers of the New Testament. If believe we have erred we invite you to sit down with us and show us from scripture where you believe we are in error.”

      We have no Popes in our midst.

      • Eugene Adkins 5:07 pm on 2014-08-02 Permalink | Reply

        Invitations to sit and study don’t equate to expectations of error being realized. Humility is needed for such a situation, and unfortunately humility is not always a virtue when talking to a person who has painted themselves into a terrible corner but they don’t want to admit it, or they can’t. The Diotrephes syndrome has been around for quite a while, and unfortunately it continues to be.

    • Jack Wirtz 7:43 am on 2014-08-03 Permalink | Reply

      My apology, I misunderstood the focus of your comments.

      • Eugene Adkins 7:57 am on 2014-08-03 Permalink | Reply

        No apologies needed, Jack.

        I completely understand the point that you were making, and in principle I believe a lot of preachers within the church do strive to follow what you said for the most part, but my experience has been one that says that although we may not have any “elected popes” we do struggle with some individuals who have become one of the self-appointed type.

        When someone refuses to see the obvious because it contradicts a very hard-line stance, or a very poorly worded one, that they have taken it is silly for them to demand that others see their error when they will not see their own.

        Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

  • Eugene Adkins 7:10 am on 2014-05-16 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, ,   

    One Way to Avoid Becoming a Pharisee 

    Study the interactions between Jesus and Pharisees long enough and you’ll notice that they were more interested in disciplining the Law of God than they were in allowing the Law of God to disciple them!

    And if we want to avoid the same fate we must avoid the same mentality.

    But go and learn what this means: ‘I desire mercy and not sacrifice.’ For I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance.” (Matthew 9:13)

     
  • TFRStaff 8:09 am on 2014-03-30 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , , , , ,   

    Go Kick Tommy’s Cat 

    Harry Grant got up in a bad mood on Monday. Upon arriving at work he called in his sales manager and chewed him out because his report was tardy. The sales manager called in his secretary and chewed her out for several letters she had failed to file. The secretary saw the receptionist and yelled at her for not relaying some messages the previous day. The receptionist opened her door at home that evening and saw her son’s new jeans had a hole in the knee and sent him to bed without supper. On the way upstairs Tommy saw the family cat and kicked it all the way across the room.

    Wouldn’t it have been better on everyone if Mr. Grant had simply gone over to Tommy’s house and kicked the cat himself and left all those other folks in a good mood?

    How many times have I thought of that little story when I have been responsible for ruining the mood around our house by being in a bad mood and passing it along to others? How many times have I seen this take place in the church, where one person’s ill manners could start a chain of events that led to a great problem, even division?

    Then on the other hand, I have seen someone enter a rather sticky situation, and their manners and grace changed the whole atmosphere into a lovely place to be. And then you begin to think…”Isn’t this the kind of person I had rather be?” Anybody can ruin a good atmosphere. And anyone can improve a bad one. That is, if we will put our Christian principles into practice.

    Let me challenge you! Make your Bible class the best place in the world to be on Sunday morning and Wednesday night. Make our assemblies the nicest place to spend time, and you will find more people wanting to spend time there. Work and make the atmosphere pleasant wherever you are. Take it easy on Tommy’s cat! !

    For His Cause, Tim Woodward

    via the Smithville Church of Christ

     
    • Gede Prama 12:36 pm on 2014-03-30 Permalink | Reply

      And I love all the posts in this blog really interesting touch words, thank you friend 🙂

  • TFRStaff 4:00 am on 2013-12-26 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude,   

    How is your attitude? 

    Harry Perry was told he was dying of leukemia, so he threw in the towel and started to act as if life was over. He quit his job, ruled out marriage, spent thousands on treatments, drank heavily, and spent most of his time alone. He was waiting to die, but he might as well have been dead already.

    Harry’s life was empty, even though he wasn’t dead. As a matter of fact, he wasn’t even dying.

    About 5 years after the initial diagnosis, another checkup showed that Harry did not have the disease. He has since then married, bought a home, and quit treatments. He feels great. Nothing has actually changed except Harry’s attitude. When he thought he was dying, he set a course of self-destruction. When he learned he wasn’t a victim of leukemia, he set a course of happy living.

    The application to this story is that some of us may be physically alive; however, mentally dead, meaning our negative attitudes quenches our spiritual joy. We if want joy and happiness, then we must change our attitudes.

    John 15:7-11—”If ye abide in me, and my words abide in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you. Herein is my Father glorified, that ye bear much fruit; so shall ye be my disciples. As the Father hath loved me, so have I loved you: continue ye in my love. If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide in my love; Even as I have kept my Father’s commandments, and abide in his love. These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full.”

    Thoughts For Today to Brighten Your Day
    By Glenn, Mercedes and Lauren Hitchcock
    Warner Robins church of Christ, Warner Robins Georgia
    http://www.wrcoc.com

     
  • TFRStaff 3:50 am on 2011-12-01 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude   

    How is your attitude? 

    Harry Perry was told he was dying of leukemia, so he threw in the towel and started to act as if life was over. He quit his job, ruled out marriage, spent thousands on treatments, drank heavily, and spent most of his time alone. He was waiting to die, but he might as well have been dead already. Harry’s life was empty, even though he wasn’t dead. As a matter of fact, he wasn’t even dying.

    About 5 years after the initial diagnosis, another checkup showed that Harry did not have the disease. He has since then married, bought a home, and quit treatments. He feels great. Nothing has actually changed except Harry’s attitude. When he thought he was dying, he set a course of self-destruction. When he learned he wasn’t a victim of leukemia, he set a course of happy living.

    The application to this story is that some of us may be physically alive; however, mentally dead, meaning our negative attitudes are quenching our spiritual joy. We if want joy and happiness, then we must change our attitudes.

    John 15:7-11 If you abide in Me, and My words abide in you, you will ask what you desire, and it shall be done for you. By this My Father is glorified, that you bear much fruit; so you will be My disciples. As the Father loved Me, I also have loved you; abide in My love. If you keep My commandments, you will abide in My love, just as I have kept My Father’s commandments and abide in His love. These things I have spoken to you, that My joy may remain in you, and that your joy may be full.

    "Thoughts For Today to Brighten Your Day" by Glenn, Mercedes and Lauren Hitchcock

     
  • Mike Riley 10:04 am on 2010-11-11 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , attitude, , , , wrote   

    Reflections At The Cross – A Contrast Of Two Thieves 

    In response to today’s nudge, Here’s an article I wrote contrasting the attitude of the two thieves that were crucified along with our Lord:

    http://mbriley.preachersfiles.com/2009/07/10/a-contrast-of-two-thieves/

     
  • Mike Riley 9:31 pm on 2010-10-29 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , , lend, mold, Phillips, remake, squeeze, ,   

    A Precise And Clear Rendering Of Romans 12:2 

    The J.B. Phillips translation lends clarity to Romans 12:2:

    “Don’t let the world around you squeeze you into its own mould [mold], but let God re-make you so that your whole attitude of mind is changed.”

     
  • Mike Riley 7:17 am on 2010-10-15 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , dependency, , , , ,   

    Does Prayer Change Anything? 

    In Eric Rauch’s article, “Does Prayer Change Anything,” Mr. Rauch observes the following:

    “One of the best descriptions of the purpose of prayer can be found in Arthur W. Pink’s book, The Sovereignty of God.”

    He quotes:

    “Prayer is not so much an act as it is an attitude—an attitude of dependency, dependency upon God. Prayer is a confession of creature weakness, yea, of helplessness. Prayer is the acknowledgment of our need and the spreading of it before God.”

    Paul said it another way: “Pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17).

     
  • jimnewy 4:26 pm on 2010-03-05 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude,   

    Keeping a Good Attitude 

    How do you keep a good attitude? Sometimes that’s a problem for me when I let something get under my skin. The biggest emotion for me to overcome are lazy or “don’t care” people. That is when my irritation shows, even when I try to not let it. It’s in my voice before I realize it. How do I get over it. I just to have ask and tell myself it’s importance, then move on. I also have a problem with my own physical ailments at times. Yesterday was one of those days. I was in pain when sitting at my PC and then it became a slug. A little self talk on the importance of what I wanted to do. Told myself it wasn’t and started doing somethings to revive the speed. By the time that was accomplished it was too late to do much. I missed responding to a couple of nudge responses, but I appreciated being able to read all of your responses.

     
  • Mike Riley 2:17 pm on 2010-03-05 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude, , , , , , , pilgrim, ,   

    How do I keep a good attitude? By maintaining a spiritual mindset – keeping focused on those things above – looking to Jesus, the author and finisher of my faith – looking for that “better country” (Colossians 3:1-2; Hebrews 12:1-2; Hebrews 11:16). Many times in my mind, I sing “This world Is not my home, I’m just a passing through.”

    If we’ll think of this world as just our temporary dwelling place, and that we are nothing more than “strangers and pilgrims” on it (Hebrews 11:13), we’ll have a better attitude toward life and living.

    Brethren, there’s something “better” ahead of us!

     
  • Laura 12:08 pm on 2010-03-05 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude   

    How do you keep a good attitude? 

    I find that when I’m having attitude problems, listening to congregational singing really helps. I keep several CDs in my car just for that purpose. Of course, one time I was so into the songs that I failed to pay attention to the speed limit sign. My attitude when even further south when the officer pointed out the error of my way. 🙁

     
  • paulaharington 11:55 am on 2010-03-05 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: attitude   

    Attitude 

    It can make us or break us. Someone once said, “The only disability in life is a bad attitude.” I agree with Ron, there are some days when it’s difficult to have a good one. However, attitudes are infectious. If we can stay positive, then we can influence others for Christ.

    I’m a music lover so it’s always playing in our home. My parents loved music, too. I remember How Great Thou Art, Our God is Alive, and Ring the Message Out playing in the background while doing homework.

    We must think Jesus, look for the cross, and stay focused.

     
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