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  • J. Randal Matheny 2:56 pm on 2017-02-10 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: clergy, , ,   

    We got clergy in the Lord’s church 

    Ron T. has an excellent article that deserves a close reading, “Dismissing the preacher for a change in direction.”

    What Ron describes is a symptom of a larger problem, it would seem, of treating preachers (and preachers considering themselves) as employees.

    You hear and read it all the time, that a man is a “preacher for” such-and-such congregation. Language betrays. Profound restoration is needed on this point.

    In the 2017 FHU Lectureship book, a contributor wrote¬†about “lay” preachers. Editors let that¬†go.

    What is the opposite of laymen? Clergy.

     
    • Eugene 3:23 pm on 2017-02-10 Permalink | Reply

      Concerning the FHU writing, do you believe it’s possible the contributor made a poor choice in wording and should have used “vocational” instead?

      • J. Randal Matheny 5:41 pm on 2017-02-10 Permalink | Reply

        Possibly, yes. It was translated into Spanish and the translator, from my incomplete knowledge of that language, chose to use a word meaning “simple,” taking it to mean, apparently, unschooled. But how does such a term insinuate itself into the language of a people who used to fight tooth and toenail the idea of clergy and laity? Many of our preachers and saints do consider the full-time “minister” to be a clergyman, if not in “theology” then in practice. Most churches act like it, too.

        • Eugene Adkins 10:32 am on 2017-02-11 Permalink | Reply

          I thought that might be the case, but I still hear you. It’s much akin to the same way a tie becomes equated to a collar in some eyes.

          • J. Randal Matheny 11:59 am on 2017-02-11 Permalink | Reply

            Ha! Good one. True.

    • James Pasley 4:35 pm on 2017-02-11 Permalink | Reply

      What you have pointed out here is just one more step on the road toward denominationalism. I also read Ron’s article and found it to have a good point. On the other side of the preacher being dismissed to “go a different direction” are the preachers who use smaller congregations as a stepping stone like a hireling so that they can go on to bigger and better things. Many preachers leave a congregation behind not because there is anything wrong with the leadership or outlook of the congregation, but simply to move to a bigger better paying position. There are times on both sides when the preacher or the congregation may want to serve the Lord in a different way or bring in someone who may have some new ideas (in matters of opinion, not doctrine). These things are not necessarily wrong or sinful, but the way it is handled sometimes is.

      • J. Randal Matheny 12:37 pm on 2017-02-13 Permalink | Reply

        James, I have observed from afar what you noted, and hoped that my conclusions were wrong. I saw this happen recently and felt profound sadness.

  • J. Randal Matheny 5:43 am on 2013-01-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Anglican Church, clergy,   

     
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