Tagged: Comfort Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • TFRStaff 6:38 am on 2015-07-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Comfort, divine fellowship, , favor of God, , , , , ,   

    July 2015 Issue of Christian Worker (I Shall Not Want…) 

    Here’s a link to the latest PDF issue of the Christian Worker.

    Here are the topics that you will find:

    • I Shall Not Want…for Providential Provisions (Ryan Smithey)
    • The Lord is My Shepherd (Sam Willcut)
    • I Shall Not Want…for Peaceful Guidance (Drew Kizer)
    • I Shall Not Want…for Confident Courage and Companionship (Jason Rollo)
    • I Shall Not Want…for Comforting Deliverance (Israel Rodriquez)
    • I Shall Not Want…for Joyful Favor (Joshua Rodriquez)
    • I Shall Not Want…for Hope and Security (John Hall)

    Christian Worker is an edification effort of the Southwest church of Christ in Austin, Texas.

    You can subscribe to the email version of the Christian Worker paper by clicking on the publications link on their website and then following the given instructions…or by clicking on the link provided here in The Fellowship Room under the “Friends” category to your right.

    Copyright © 2015 Southwest church of Christ, All rights reserved.

     
  • John T. Polk II 7:45 am on 2014-05-21 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Comfort, , , , , ,   

    (#171) The Proverbs of Solomon 24:27-Comfort Is Not Job One! 

    Since God Created humans, only God can provide specific understanding of human behavior. God gave Solomon Divine Wisdom (1 Kings Chapters 3 and 10) to explain what and why behavior is as it is, and Proverbs 10:1-24:34 are randomly written, as if they were Solomon’s judgments about individual cases brought to him, or simply God-given explanations about life. New Testament passages may help see the continuation of Wisdom offered through Jesus Christ. Proverbs 24:27: “Prepare your outside work, Make it fit for yourself in the field; And afterward build your house.” Work must come before convenience and comfort. The Garden of Eden came with a job (Genesis 2:15), having food requires work (2 Thessalonians 3:10), and this proverb emphasizes the comforts of a house depends upon how good of a job one does “outside” to earn that house! Many people have turned this completely around, for they are getting bigger and bolder houses, beyond what their parents have achieved, before establishing themselves in a career-type work. The order here taught by Wisdom should be to learn to work and earn while living with their parents so they are ready to embark upon working experiences that will help them toward their goal(s). All Old Testament prophecies of the Israelites returning to their Promised Land were fulfilled in the Books of Ezra and Nehemiah, however not without urging. In Ezra chapter 4, the re-building of the temple in Jerusalem stalled out, but God sent the prophets Haggai and Zechariah to preach plainly (Ezra 5:1). The people should not have been building their own houses and neglecting God’s House: “Thus speaks the LORD of hosts, saying: ‘This people says, “The time has not come, the time that the LORD’S house should be built.’ Then the word of the LORD came by Haggai the prophet, saying, ‘Is it time for you yourselves to dwell in your paneled houses, and this temple to lie in ruins? Now therefore, thus says the LORD of hosts: “Consider your ways!”’” (Haggai 1:2-5) Jesus applied this very truth to spiritual matters when: “great multitudes went with Him. And He turned and said to them, ‘If anyone comes to Me and does not hate his father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters, yes, and his own life also, he cannot be My disciple. And whoever does not bear his cross and come after Me cannot be My disciple. For which of you, intending to build a tower, does not sit down first and count the cost, whether he has enough to finish it — lest, after he has laid the foundation, and is not able to finish, all who see it begin to mock him, saying, “This man began to build and was not able to finish.” Or what king, going to make war against another king, does not sit down first and consider whether he is able with ten thousand to meet him who comes against him with twenty thousand? Or else, while the other is still a great way off, he sends a delegation and asks conditions of peace. So likewise, whoever of you does not forsake all that he has cannot be My disciple’” (Luke 14:25-33). Jesus also said, “But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you” (Matthew 6:33). Obey the Lord first (Acts 2:38), get a job second (Ephesians 4:28), then plan some comforts (Proverbs 24:27). All Scriptures and comments are based upon the New King James Version, unless otherwise noted.

     
  • John T. Polk II 4:54 am on 2013-03-08 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Comfort, , , , , reproach,   

    Psalm 119:49-56 Zayin Finding Comfort In Affliction 

    It is fitting that the greatest tribute to the Word of God is IN the Word of God, itself, and is in the longest chapter of the Word of God! This Psalm has no author’s name, historical incident, or other distraction from its theme. It is divided into 22 sections (one for every letter in the Hebrew alphabet), each consisting of 8 lines, each line beginning with the alphabet letter of that section (aleph is the first letter of each line under the aleph section, for instance). The chapter uses some 8-10 different words to describe the Word of God, each bringing something extra to the total picture of the Word of Truth. In order to savor the depth and richness of teaching in this Psalm, we will examine each portion as if it were its own chapter.

     

    Verses 49-50 show our hope is founded upon God’s fulfilled promises;

    Verses 51-54 show how this helps us;

    Verses 55-56 show how this makes God’s Law our own.

    Verses 49-50: (Verse 49) The “hope” of a lover is that the one loved will remember the “word” (covenant, commitment) they have made. God does not forget (2 Peter 3:9), but “remember” lets us know that enough time may have passed from the promise to the fulfillment that we have become edgy. This is why the phrase is used, for God “remembered” his covenant with Noah (Genesis 8:1), Abraham (Genesis 19:29), Rachel (Genesis 30:22), and the Israelites (Exodus 2:24). (Verse 50) When “affliction” (troubles, distresses) attacks us, our “comfort” (ease of mind, confidence) comes from remembering God’s help in the past. “For whatever things were written before were written for our learning, that we through the patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope” (Romans 15:4). God’s Word gives us “life” (vitalizes, refreshes our spirit), Jesus said, “The words that I speak to you are spirit, and they are life” (John 6:63).

    Verses 51-54: (Verse 51) The believer is comfortable to remain in the life set forth in God’s “law” (guide, make straight), so the “great derision” of the “proud” cannot affect me. We may be taunted for our faith, but we will never be taunted out of our faith! “For consider Him [Jesus Christ] who endured such hostility from sinners against Himself, lest you become weary and discouraged in your souls” (Hebrews 12:3). (Verse 52) The record of God’s “judgments of old” (decisions, actions for the “good” and punishments against the “bad”) is the written Word of God, which when studied, brings comfort to the reader. God will not miraculously give comfort to us, but has Christians who may come for aid and assistance with the proper passages (2 Corinthians 1:3-4) that we may “comfort one another with these words” (1 Thessalonians 4:18). (Verse 53) The believer may be provoked by the “wicked, who forsake” God’s law, as Solomon observed: “Moreover I saw under the sun: In the place of judgment, Wickedness was there; And in the place of righteousness, Iniquity was there. I said in my heart, ‘God shall judge the righteous and the wicked, For there is a time there for every purpose and for every work’” (Ecclesiastes 3:16-17). (Verse 54) Reminding ourselves of God’s “statutes” (definite lines marking the difference between good and evil) become our “songs” while we are in our “house of my pilgrimage” (living on earth in our bodies, 2 Corinthians 5:1-4).

    Verses 55-56: (Verse 55) God’s “name” gives comfort and confidence through “the night” (those dreary days, troublesome times, depressions, dreads) as long as we “keep” (observe, obey) God’s “law” and “precepts” (things to notice, directions for conduct). (Verse 56) The comfort of the word of God “has become mine” for it has guided one through “affliction” and maintained “hope.” These personal experiences are what “Increase our faith” (Luke 17:5).

    All Scriptures and comments are based upon the New King James Version, unless otherwise noted.

     
  • Ron Thomas 7:00 am on 2013-02-18 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort,   

    Questions About Divine Comfort 

    It may not be realized, but Jeremiah struggled on occasion with the Lord’s response to him individually (Jeremiah 15:18). Jeremiah was God’s servant during the last days of Judah’s existence as a nation. He was to speak the Lord’s word to a people who refused to hear; when he became wearied by it, he actually wondered if the Lord had left him. The Lord’s answer to Jeremiah was not at all the expected answer (Jeremiah 15:19). In other words, the Lord called upon Jeremiah to repent. “He must dismiss any misconceptions about God and accept the divine reality that had been revealed to him (Dayton Keesee, p. 358). Thus, let us not forget that the Lord is steady through all the turmoil one experiences in life; we must come to grips with our own emotions while experiencing the heartache and pains that we do.

     
  • Larry Miles 7:28 am on 2012-12-15 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort, God's Care   

    The God of ALL Comfort 

    I wrote this a couple  of years  ago, and it  may have   appeared here before, but  I  felt that it was   appropriate to  feature it because of the tragedy yesterday in CT (Larry Miles)

    2 Cor 1:3-5 – Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.

    This is one of the verses that help us to understand how God comforts us and how by going through trials in our lives we are later able to help other in their trials. Our Heavenly Father is the God of ALL comfort, not just some comfort. He is the “Father of mercies,” who pours out His love on us. One verse says that He lavishes His love on us. We sometimes wonder why God allows trials in our lives. We wonder why He allows our loved ones to not get better and eventually pass way. It is so that we can have that experience and so that we can comfort someone later. When we say to one who has lost a loved one or is going through trials, “I know how you feel,” we, sometimes do not know. But If we say it in love, the person understand. But if we have experienced the same, we can be a person of encouragement like Barnabas in the book of Acts who was known as the “son of Encouragement.” So, let’s thank our Heavenly Father that He loves us so much and is always a God of all comfort.

     
  • Richard Mansel 9:06 am on 2012-09-05 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort, , great physician, , , ,   

    If the message in this photo is correct… 

    If the message in this photo is correct, what’s the point in going on? Where is hope? Where is peace? Depression would be the only logical answer.

    Thankfully, it is a lie straight from Satan’s blackened heart (John 8:44). We can help ourselves in minor ways, but we must depend on God when we do so.

    “Come to Me, all you who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take My yoke upon you and learn from Me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For My yoke is easy and My burden is light” (Matthew 11:28-30). 

     
    • Eugene Adkins 10:04 pm on 2012-09-05 Permalink | Reply

      Hard to pull your self up by the bootstraps if you don’t have any boots, huh?

  • Eugene Adkins 11:21 pm on 2012-07-27 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort, , , Olympics,   

    The Greatest Gathering of Nations for All Time 

    I just finished watching the entrance of the nations for this year’s Olympics! I love watching the entrance ceremony. All the different flags. All the different nationalities. All the different individuals. All the smiles in the same spot together. It truly is a great gathering of the world’s people.

    The Olympic Games brings nations together on a scale that no other event has rivaled. At least not yet. But a gathering of nations is coming that will cause the Olympics to pale in comparison. When will this event happen? It’s not my responsibility to tell when. My responsibility is just to teach that it’s coming, and that there won’t be a nation that’s not represented when it begins.

    When the Son of Man comes in His glory, and all the holy angels with Him, then He will sit on the throne of His glory. All the nations will be gathered before Him, and He will separate them one from another, as a shepherd divides his sheep from the goats.” (Matthew 25:31-32 , NKJV)

    This sight is unimaginable, but it will become a reality. This sight is incomprehensible, but the reason will be understood. This sight is unapproachable, but we will not be able to refuse its beckon.

    At this gathering every nation will be present, but there will be no competition. At this gathering every nation will be present, but there will not be a universal celebration. At this gathering every nation will be present, but the glory will belong to only one Victor.

    But honestly, this wasn’t the thought that entered into my mind as I watched all the nations usher in the Olympics of 2012. The thought that entered into my mind was another gathering of the nations that I can’t wait to see.

    This gathering will begin on a high note, and stay there. This gathering will combine people from all of Earth’s nations into one eternal home. There will be no language barrier. There will be no envy. There will be no hate. There will be no harm. There will be no night. There will be no sadness. There will be no fear. There will be no end to this gathering; and thus this gathering, in my humble opinion, will not only be the greatest gathering of nations of all time…it will be the greatest gathering of nations for all time!

    After these things I saw a great army of people more than might be numbered, out of every nation and of all tribes and peoples and languages, taking their places before the high seat and before the Lamb, dressed in white robes, and with branches in their hands, saying with a loud voice, Salvation to our God who is seated on the high seat, and to the Lamb.” (Revelation 7:9-10, BBE)

    The context is for those who came through the persecution, but the comfort is one of encouragement for all Christians. Just imagine what the entrance and gathering of the nations in Heaven is going to look like!

     
  • John Henson 9:22 am on 2010-10-30 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort, ,   

    Comfort food 

    If we’re talking about real comfort, then we’re talking John 6:51-58.

    Jesus the Son of God is the only real comfort. As the Apostle Paul wrote, “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort,  who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God,” (2 Corinthians 1:3-4 ESV).

    God not only comforts us, but he enables us to comfort others. That’s real, satisfying comfort!

     
  • John Henson 1:00 pm on 2010-03-12 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort,   

    Christ our comfort 

                God wants us to be comforted.

                The scriptures discuss it over and over. In 2 Corinthians 1:2, Paul calls God the “God of all comfort.” In Colossians 2:1-2, Paul wanted the people of that division-torn city to be comforted, or encouraged, as one translation renders its meaning. Jesus promised his disciples a “comforter,” (John 14:16, 26).

                Comfort means different things to different people. While writing this article, I’m in an airplane at 34,000 feet and the air is a little bumpy. I’d rather be on the ground, where I’m a little more comfortable. My wife’s idea of comfort is sitting curled up on a couch. If it’s winter, she’d also be more comfortable sitting in front of a roaring fire.

                When the Bible’s writers talk about comfort, they use a word that means “to call to the side of.” For example, the same word used in Colossians 2:2 is used in 1 John 2:1-2, which says, “My little children, I write unto you that you sin not, but if anyone sins, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous; and he is the propitiation for our sins and not for ours only, but for the sins of the whole world.” The word “advocate” is this same word as “comfort” or “comforter” as used in these other references.

                As our advocate, Jesus Christ is called to our side to represent us, much as a lawyer is called to our side to help us. But the word “advocate” is stronger than that. It also carries with it the idea that with Christ, we are “brave together.” Here’s where the comfort comes.

                Were we to stand naked and alone before God, we wouldn’t have very much confidence in ourselves. As sinners, we are convicted of transgressing God’s law. That transgression brings with it a lack of confidence in standing before a perfect being.

                But, because our Lord shed his blood to cleanse us from sin, we have been freed from sin and live for Him who gave himself for us. Being thus redeemed, we have an advocate. Any further transgression is resolved by His blood (1 John 1:7). Of course, we must continue to walk in the light. If not, we can still be lost in sin.

                Because our Lord shed his blood to redeem us, he stands beside us and owns us. His standing beside us is a great comfort because we know he understands what it’s like to be human and can sympathize with us in our weakness.

                Now, we can stand “brave together” with our Lord. It is this confidence the Hebrew writer speaks about in Hebrews 10:35, which says, “Cast not away your confidence which hath great recompense of reward.” The writer thus is encouraging his readers to stand bravely together with Christ, not casting him aside.

                And so we should stand with our comfort, Jesus, our confidence, our advocate

     
    • Mike Riley 2:52 pm on 2010-03-12 Permalink | Reply

      John, thanks so much for bringing out the fact that our Lord is indeed our comfort. Because He’s “been there, and done that,” we can have confidence in standing before our righteous God on judgment day.

      • John Henson 3:05 pm on 2010-03-12 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks, Mike. I appreciate the encouragement, brother.

  • Larry Miles 2:53 am on 2010-02-04 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort, ,   

    The God of ALL Comfort 

    2 Cor 1:3-5Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction so that we will be able to comfort those who are in any affliction with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.

    This is one of the verses that help us to understand how God comforts us and how by going through trials in our lives we are later able to help other in their trials. Our Heavenly Father is the God of ALL comfort, not just some comfort. He is the “Father of mercies,” who pours out His love on us. One verse says that He lavishes His love on us. We sometimes wonder why God allows trials in our lives. We wonder why He allows our loved ones to not get better and eventually pass way. It is so that we can have that experience and so that we can comfort someone later. When we say to one who has lost a loved one or is going through trials, “I know how you feel,” we, sometimes do not know. But If we say it in love, the person understand. But if we have experienced the same, we can be a person of encouragement like Barnabas in the book of Acts who was known as the “son of encouragement.” So, let’s thank our Heavenly Father that He loves us so much and is always a God of all comfort.

     
  • Ron Thomas 12:49 pm on 2009-12-03 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Comfort   

    Shortly after I became a Christian, I had a view of God that was more in line with partisanship than reality. I actually did see God much different than I do today. At one time, He was there to let me know I failed. While I also knew He would pick me up, it was more of the former than the latter. Now, I know in a very vivid, personal, and disappointing way my failings. Perhaps, it might be said that God does not need to tell them to me, but now when I view Him, I view Him more along the line of Matthew 11:28-30 than I do Hebrews 10:31. I do not minimize the latter, but I do take comfort in the former (John 6:68-69)!

     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
shift + esc
cancel