Job 18

  1. Bildad speaks for the second time. Once again the accusation is now leveled at Job and the contempt he (Job) has for his friends as they seek to help (18:1-4). A short treatise on the experiences of those who are wicked (18:5-21).
  2. Application. What does one say that has not been said when communication is not taking place. On the other hand, communication is very much taking place between the two parties; it’s just that both parties are rejecting what the other is saying. On this side of history we know well that Job is right, but Job’s friends were not convinced of that. They were convinced that the foundation from which they were speaking was on bedrock; it is unshakable. Job knew better, but they rejected Job’s knowledge.  **** Is the bedrock of our principles based upon the traditions passed down? Are they based upon the word of God? What are they based on? Perhaps there is a combination of both. In such circumstances let us be sure that when we think and speak of eternal matters that our bedrock of principles are “foundationed” on Him who transcends all.

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Job 16 and 17

  1. Job replies and remarks that his friends are of no value to him at all (16:1-5). Job ascribes the work of his friends in his direction (16:6-17), and that work is one that is ungodly and destructive; in fact, it is the Lord’s doing that all this is being experienced as his friends converse with him. Job makes an appeal that his cry is always heard (16:18-22). Again, Job’s speaks of the lack of wisdom among his friends (17:1-5). Though Job is physically worn out he will still hold to his righteousness (17:6-9). Since Job’s friends have no wisdom to help him understand he resigns himself to the inevitability of death and hopelessness (17:10-16).
  2. Application. Comforting another person does not come easily for some. Job valued his friends, at this point, as miserable comforters; they were of no value to him. Sometimes we find ourselves in a spot where we don’t know what to do, what to say, or how to reply when one says something. Sometimes it is best to say nothing at all. We have learned, by now, that one thing that ought not to be done is for one to take a predisposition and apply that to another’s circumstance. One’s comforting ability is fraught with failure.

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Job 15

  1. Eliphaz speaks for a second time. He accuses Job of speaking useless words; more than that, he says that even what Job says is self-condemnatory (15:1-6). A series of questions posed to Job to humble his current attitude (15:7-16). The remainder of the chapter has Eliphaz make clear what even those older that Eliphaz have been saying in regard to the wicked suffering, not escaping from God’s judgment (15:18-35).
  2. Application. We get our first sense of the age of at least some of Job’s friends (15:10). With this kind of “wisdom” why would anyone begin to think that it is wrong? It has been passed down through the generations and one who rejects what is so “obvious” is not even rational! **** It is reasonable that men and women who have accumulated years and experience will have something to offer the younger generation; it may even be reasonable that the older generation will have much to offer that is right. On the other hand, the foundations from which spring their own knowledge may be built upon sand.

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Job 12-14

  1. Job’s friends are not the only ones who can discern, or has wisdom (12:1-3). As one (Job) who appealed to the Lord, and God answered, Job received his friends who have done nothing but mock his circumstances. On the other hand, those who mock God, they are the ones who prosper – even the creatures of the earth understand this (12:4-12). What God can do if He desired (12:13-25). Job maintains his integrity and desires an opportunity to make his case before the Lord (13:1-12). The friends of Job are of no value to him during this time of affliction (13:4, 13-19).  Job appeals to the Lord for an audience in order to make his case (13:20-28). Man’s time on the earth is but fleeting (13:28; 14:1-6). Death is like sleep; when man dies he will not see life again (14:7-12). Job longs to be hidden in the grave because he is worn out (14:13-22).
  2. Application. Job suffers grievously for something he does not know; along come his friends and they lay guilt on him, but for what they can’t say. Now God crushes man’s hope and Job’s hope is gone. **** Clearly the remarks of a frustrated and desperate man. Those of us on this side of Job’s life can see that Job’s hope is not gone, but have you ever felt so overwhelmed by some moral failing, some circumstantial matter that all hope for life was gone (cf. 2 Corinthians 1:8)? If you have not then count yourself fortunate; you are rare! How well will you be able to relate with one who has?

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Job 11

 

  1. Zophar continues the accusation that Job has already rejected. Surely, Job, you are receiving less than you deserve and, for certain, you are in no position to speak the way you are against the Lord’s wisdom in afflicting you as He has (11:1-20).
  2. Application. The wisdom of Job’s three friends, thus far, is fine with regard to living righteously in this world. The fault to be found with them, however, is in their accusation that Job’s personal strife (affliction) is a result of his sin, and the Lord is punishing him for it. This in-grained belief of theirs is not exclusive to that time (cf. Luke 13:1-5), and in this rational discourse with Job they felt he was not dealing with the obvious (reason for his afflictions). In fact, Job’s varied replies had not shown them that their in-grained belief was wrong.

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Job 9 and 10

  1. Job takes up the last few words of Bildad and says that he understands the wisdom of those who have gone before, but a man’s standing in front of God – how can a man stand before the Lord blameless (9:1-13)? One can’t stand before the Lord to reason with Him, but that the Lord will but crush him (9:14-20). Job now begins to question the Lord in a more serious vein (9:21-31). He summarizes his lack of standing before the Lord (9:32-35). Yet he speaks before him (10:1-12), in frustration and lament, his clear reverent understanding that it is the Lord who made him, but why would God create only to destroy, especially the innocent (10:3, 8, 18)? Job appeal to the Lord to just let him alone so he can die quietly (10:13-22).
  2. Application. Hailey gave an interesting perspective to Job’s lament in C-9: Job hit his lowest point in his frustration and lack of understanding “…when he concluded that there is no moral government in the universe, and that therefore it is all one with God whether man does right or wrong” (p. 99). **** Have you ever shaken your fist at the Lord? I have; I almost remember it vividly, but the years have somewhat clouded my thinking. I was not more than 23 years old, and one knows how much wisdom a 23 year old has! I understand mercy.

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Job 8

  1. Bildad speaks and is sure to not let Job forget the actual reason for his affliction. Job’s children suffered their calamity for the very same reason Job is now: sin (8:1-7). Utilizing the wisdom of the past (8:8-10), those who are overly confident and hypocrites (Job), the Lord cuts down (8:11-18). Appeal to the Lord and he will exult you (8:19-22).
  2. Application. The wisdom of those who have gone before us may be of great quality. Their wisdom, however, is a wisdom that results from living on this earth as all human beings do. We all have accumulated wisdom in whatever amount of time we have lived (to this point); are we foolish, however, to think that what we have accumulated is right in all respects? Not likely. The same with those of the past. Wisdom is the correct application of knowledge; knowledge, however, can be faulty. Thus, wisdom is the correct application of true knowledge.

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