The revelation of Jesus Christ in Galatians

The book of Revelation isn’t the only “revelation of Jesus Christ” in the New Testament. There are a few actually. One in particular is found in Galatians 3:23:

But before faith came, we were kept under guard by the law, kept for the faith which would afterward be revealed.” (NKJV)

In the middle of a conversation about justification from sin, the burden of the justifying one’s self with the law of Moses, a promise made to Abraham and the role of Moses’ law in relation to the faith which saves our soul, Paul makes an interesting statement about how God would ultimately justify his people. He says it was God’s plan to reveal the faith after the Law fulfilled its purpose.

The word “reveal” comes from the Greek word “apokalupto” meaning, “to uncover, to lay open what has been veiled, to disclose; to make known.” So, in other words, Galatians 3:23 is the revelation of Jesus Christ in Galatians (note that the Greek for the book of Revelation comes from “apokalupsis” which for all intents and purposes has the same root meaning).

The “revelation” in Galatians is important because the Gospel of Jesus Christ teaches (in more ways than one) that something is “removed” or “unveiled” when an individual stops depending upon their own work through the Law of Moses and starts depending upon the work of Jesus through faith (2 Corinthians 3:12-18). That thing (the veil or covering) removed through the glory (or light) of the gospel, in one specific manner, is our ignorance concerning God’s intent and endpoint concerning the role of Moses’ Law – that being that the way Abraham was saved was meant to last in order to justify us all (Galatians 3:22), not the Law, which was added 430 years after the promise concerning Abraham, faith, justification and Jesus was made (Galatians 3:13-18).

This is why Abraham rejoiced when he saw the “revelation of Jesus Christ” in Galatians which had been revealed to him so long ago (John 8:56); and it’s why we should rejoice about it today!

Therefore do not be ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me His prisoner, but share with me in the sufferings for the gospel according to the power of God, who has saved us and called us with a holy calling, not according to our works, but according to His own purpose and grace which was given to us in Christ Jesus before time began, but has now been revealed by the appearing of our Savior Jesus Christ, who has abolished death and brought life and immortality to light through the gospel,” (2 Timothy 1:8-10 NKJV)

#galatians, #greek-grammar, #justification-by-faith, #justification-by-the-law-of-moses

Not ‘as you go’

The brethren often pick up bad habits from the denominationals. Here’s one: Saying that the “Go” of Mt 28.19 means, “as you go.” It appears to be a justification for not going into all the world as a defined mission for the church.

Except that it’s all wrong.

When an aorist participle is followed by an aorist imperative in narrative literature, it almost invariably piggy-backs on the force of the imperative. That is, it is translated like an imperative because the author is trying to communicate a command. — The Great Commission or the Great Suggestion? – Daniel B. Wallace

I don’t often say something is a must-read. This one is.

#great-commission, #greek-grammar, #mission