Did God speak to King Necho of Egypt?

It sure seems like he did. See this passage:

After Josiah had done all this for the temple, King Necho of Egypt marched up to do battle at Carchemish on the Euphrates River. Josiah marched out to oppose him. Necho sent messengers to him, saying, “Why are you opposing me, O king of Judah? I am not attacking you today, but the kingdom with which I am at war. God told me to hurry. Stop opposing God, who is with me, or else he will destroy you.” But Josiah did not turn back from him; he disguised himself for battle. He did not take seriously the words of Necho which he had received from God; he went to fight him in the Plain of Megiddo. 2 Chron 35.20-22

It’s not terribly unusual for God to speak to pagans, even foreign kings. But this is a twist: a foreign king speaking the word of God to a king of Judah. One supposes that if God can make a donkey can speak to a prophet, he can make a pagan king speak to his anointed one.

It could have been through a dream. Apparently, the Chronicler has Spirit inspiration behind him to confirm that it was God who spoke to Necho. But how would Josiah have figured that out? What expectation would he have that this pagan ruler was actually bringing him a revelation from God? It’s a passage that puzzles me.

Got any perspectives on it?

#2chronicles, #josiah, #revelation

It’s a Deal! A Take-It-or-Leave-It Deal!

fight-for-topIrks me to no end to hear or read the phrase “preacher for ___ church.” You’ll note that we avoid it in places like Brotherhood News and Forthright Magazine. Sure, Paul can call himself a servant of the church, but the modern phrase comes from a far inferior concept — an employer-employee mentality, exactly part of the problem today in the American church. Continue reading

#caitlyn-jenner, #corollaries, #halloween, #hebrews, #new-covenant, #preaching, #revelation

God Spoke to Me

A surrendered heart is crucial in one’s relationship with God, but to use John 14:21 and say that “revelation comes to those who are willing to follow God’s ways” is a plain misuse of the passage, even the context. Jesus is speaking exclusively to His twelve disciples (less one). That promise which He spoke to them was for them, not for any of us today. We are not guided into all truth except through the very written word of God! The apostles did not have for themselves a “Bible” that could be taken into all the world. What they had was God’s Spirit that taught them that which God wanted them to know (1 John 1:1-3; 4:1, 6). This they taught and wrote down for man today (cf. Jude 3).

How does God speak to us today? He speaks to us through His revealed (written) word. This is abundantly clear when one considers the following:

Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets,  but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son, whom he appointed the heir of all things, through whom also he created the world. (Hebrews 1:1-2,ESV)

To this he called you through our gospel, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. (2 Thessalonians 2:14, ESV)

I hope to come to you soon, but I am writing these things to you so that, if I delay, you may know how one ought to behave in the household of God, which is the church of the living God, a pillar and buttress of the truth. (1 Timothy 3:14-15, ESV)

His divine power has granted to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of him who called us to his own glory and excellence, (2 Peter 1:3, ESV)

…how the mystery was made known to me by revelation, as I have written briefly. When you read this, you can perceive my insight into the mystery of Christ, which was not made known to the sons of men in other generations as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit. This mystery is that the Gentiles are fellow heirs, members of the same body, and partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel (Ephesians 3:3-6, ESV).

When a man gets into the subjective realm of “God spoke to me” he has gone into a realm that is nothing more than “I want.” In other words, he has gone into a realm where he wants to believe that God spoke to him; it is not a realm of objective truth, but a subjective realm of “This is my opinion and don’t you tell me anything that is different!”

In such a realm, getting the objective truth of God’s revealed word into the mind of that one is difficult. On the other hand, if one is willing to compare his or her subjective approach to life in alongside the revealed word of God (Hebrews 4:12), then the subjective approach can be lain aside for the Lord’s word.

In such case, it can be said, properly, that “God spoke to me.”

#bible, #god-spoke-to-me, #revelation

Hugh's News & Views (Revelation)

INSPIRATION AND REVELATION

(Part 2)

The scriptures of both the Old and New Testaments are inspired (“breathed out of God”) and are an infallible account of God’s dealings with man down through the ages. The Bible sets forth the gradual unfolding of the grand scheme of redemption that was brought to fruition by the life, death, burial, and resurrection of Christ, and the setting up of His spiritual kingdom, the church. Continue reading

#bible, #hughfulford, #inspiration, #revelation

(#196) The Proverbs of Solomon 29:18-Be Happy

Since God Created humans, only God can provide specific understanding of human behavior. God gave Solomon Divine Wisdom (1 Kings Chapters 3 and 10) to explain what and why behavior is as it is, and Proverbs 10:1-24:34 are randomly written, as if they were Solomon’s judgments about individual cases brought to him, or simply God-given explanations about life. New Testament passages may help see the continuation of Wisdom offered through Jesus Christ.

Proverbs 29:18: “Where there is no revelation, the people cast off restraint; But happy is he who keeps the law.”

“Revelation” (“vision” in the King James Version) refers to God’s inspired Word. As God miraculously led His people, he spoke to them through a “prophet:” “So the LORD said to Moses: ‘See, I have made you as God to Pharaoh, and Aaron your brother shall be your prophet. You shall speak all that I command you. And Aaron your brother shall speak to Pharaoh to send the children of Israel out of his land’” (Exodus 7:1-2). Moses then became “the prophet” (Numbers 12:6-8) through whom God’s Law was given (Deuteronomy 34:9-12), and by following that written Law, the nation of Israel would remain separate from other peoples (Joshua 23:6-8). After Moses, unless God inspired a prophet to call the people back to that written Law, they forgot God: “In those days there was no king in Israel; everyone did what was right in his own eyes” (Judges 17:6). “Then the boy Samuel ministered to the LORD before Eli. And the word of the LORD was rare in those days; there was no widespread revelation” (1 Samuel 3:1).

King Zedekiah is an example of what this proverb is saying: “He did evil in the sight of the LORD his God, and did not humble himself before Jeremiah the prophet, who spoke from the mouth of the LORD” (2 Chronicles 36:12). Even though Christ’s Law has been given, people sin when they made to think there is no Law of God that applies to them: “To the pure all things are pure, but to those who are defiled and unbelieving nothing is pure; but even their mind and conscience are defiled” (Titus 1:15).

The New Testament is the written Law of Christ and God has not had a prophet since it was written: “If anyone thinks himself to be a prophet or spiritual, let him acknowledge that the things which I write to you are the commandments of the Lord” (1 Corinthians 14:37). Whatever people say to demean, diminish, or destroy their confidence in God’s Word does not change God’s Word: “But you, beloved, remember the words which were spoken before by the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ: how they told you that there would be mockers in the last time who would walk according to their own ungodly lusts. These are sensual persons, who cause divisions, not having the Spirit” (Jude 17-19). Christians are admonished: “Let us walk properly, as in the day, not in revelry and drunkenness, not in lewdness and lust, not in strife and envy. But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to fulfill its lusts” (Romans 13:13-14), because God’s written Word is our Judge, for Jesus said: “He who rejects Me, and does not receive My words, has that which judges him–the word that I have spoken will judge him in the last day” (John 12:48).

Where sin abounds is a fertile field for preaching and teaching the Word of God, for Jesus said: “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners, to repentance” (Mark 2:17).

“The revelation” from God is in our Bible – Be “happy!”

All Scriptures and comments are based upon the New King James Version, unless otherwise noted.

#bible, #bible-study, #gods-word, #happy, #obedience, #preaching, #prophet, #proverbs, #revelation, #vision

victory

I was recently afforded the opportunity to perform in the Murfreesboro Symphony Chorus at a concert with the Murfreesboro Symphony Orchestra. I had been to orchestral performances many times before, and while they can be very exciting, they can also be a bit tiresome during some passages. If you’re not careful, you’ll find yourself waking up to the applause of the audience at the end of a piece. This one, however–almost every moment of it–was different.

Perhaps it was the acoustics–the reverberation in the venue; perhaps it was the one or two thousand faces focused in on the stage; perhaps it was being able to see the conductor’s face for once instead of his back; perhaps it was getting to be part of a group of incredible singers to which I felt inferior; perhaps it was the beauty of the music, much of which was written by one of the best-known composers of our time. As I sang with the choir, or simply sat and listened as the orchestra played alone, excitement flowed through me like electricity during almost the entire concert. Every solo, every climax, every quiet passage, every pause created a sensation I could feel, not only in my mind and heart, but in my body. Here was a group of some of the best musicians (and me) performing excellent music by one of the most well-regarded modern composers on some of the finest instruments in a superb venue, led by one of the most talented conductors in our region. Every person there (on stage and in the audience) was focused on one thing–the music. Being in the midst of the ensemble provided for one of the most intense musical experiences I’ve ever had.

Revelation 14, 15, and 19 have descriptions of multitudes of people and angels singing praise to God. I’m afraid sometimes we think of that image and liken it to our local congregational singing, which–like any other thing we do on a regular basis–can often seem less than thrilling. Continue reading

#assembly, #book-of-revelation, #christianity, #heaven, #music, #orchestral-music, #praise, #revelation, #singing, #worship

Has Jesus Left Our Temple?

C.E.W. Dorris wrote these provocative words concerning Jesus’ departure from the temple in Mark 13:
“Sad the day for us when Jesus leaves our temple, and his voice is no longer heard pleading in our souls.”
His words evoke memory of Jesus standing at the door of the hearts of Laodicean Christians in Revelation 3. Do we sometimes ignore Jesus as we would an unwelcome guest? Do we mentally and spiritually pretend that we’re not home when our conscience senses his knocking?
Jesus calls us to follow him. That call requires attention in all areas of life, in making decisions and in forgiving as he forgives as well as in preaching sound doctrine.
Have we surrendered all? Is the voice of Jesus still pleading in our souls?

#ethics, #gospel-advocate, #jesus, #mark-13, #revelation, #sound-doctrine