From them came the Christ: Romans 9.5

“To them [the Israelites] belong the patriarchs, and from them, by human descent, came the Christ, who is God over all, blessed forever! Amen.”

Romans 9.5

Listing the advantages of the Israelites, Paul mentions the greatest of all: Jesus was born of them. They had the best position to appreciate and follow him.

The Jews rejected Jesus. Some today seem to forget he was a Jew. They also forget he is God in the flesh. They make him out to be what they want. Do I do the same?

#votd #Romans #Jesus

No partiality: Romans 2.11

“For there is no partiality with God.”

Romans 2.11

For mercy or judgment, God is the same toward all people. He acts according to his holiness. He has no preferred people. He offers no one special privileges.

People tend to prefer some above others. Even some parents are guilty of having favorite children. But to please God, we must believe in Christ and obey the Lord.

#votd #Romans #equality

The result is eternal life: Romans 6.22

“But now that you have been freed from sin and have become God’s slaves, the benefit you reap is sanctification, and the result is eternal life.”

Romans 6.22 ISV

Freedom from sin comes through obedience, vv. 17-18. Servitude to God means receiving a life wholly given over to him. The outcome is no temporary benefit but eternal life.

How many of your prayers concern things of this life? How many of your efforts seek earthly benefits? In what ways does your sanctified life manifest itself? Do you glory in being God’s servant?

#votd #Romans #eternal-life

The Spirit himself: Romans 8.16

“The Spirit himself bears witness to our spirit that we are God’s children.”

Romans 8.16

The statement above is part of an argument of Paul’s about our inheritance with Christ. He does not affirm the manner of the Spirit’s witness. But it must be a discernible, objective one, not some inner, subjective one, whether by his Word or by the production of his fruit in a Christian’s life.

We do not want to reduce the Spirit down to only the Bible, as some do. His witness is personal and real. His action continues today. Still, “let’s interpret our experiences by the Bible, and not the Bible by our experiences” (Mark Dunagan).

#votd #Romans #Holy-Spirit

I long to strengthen you: Romans 1.11

“For I long to see you, so that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to strengthen you”.

Romans 1.11

Paul hoped to visit the Romans in order to, first, bless them by passing on miraculous gifts in their midst, since they apparently had never had an apostle among them.

The desire to be among the saints is prompted in the first place by the desire to bless others, not seek a blessing for oneself.

#votd #Romans #blessing

About the things that pertain to God

“So I boast in Christ Jesus about the things that pertain to God.”

Romans 15.22

Paul’s boasting did not center in his accomplishments, but in what God has wrought in Christ and “what Christ has accomplished” v. 23. Nor did he take credit for the work of others.

Boasting in Christ amounts to praise for what God has done. It requires divesting oneself of all self-importance. It recognizes that all is done “in the power of the Spirit of God” v. 24.

#votd #boasting #Romans

We are the ones: Romans 9.24

“We are the ones God has called. We don’t come only from the Jews but we also come from the Gentiles.”

Romans 9.24 CEB

God calls people according to his sovereign grace. He has determined that those who respond in faith and obedience will be saved, independently of origin or class.

Paul does not sound arrogant here, but humbly grateful. God’s sovereignty does not deter him from evangelism, but spurs him toward it. God’s call comes through his evangelizing people.

#votd #Romans #calling

‘Spiritual worship’ in Romans 12.1

Romans 12.1-2 introduces the practical part of Paul’s letter and offers a framework to understand what follows. The last phrase of verse 1 has been variously translated. In 1993, David Peterson published “WORSHIP AND ETHICS IN ROMANS 12” in the Tyndale Bulletin. What follows is a quote from it.

If Paul’s expression is translated ‘spiritual worship’, there is a danger of accenting the inwardness of Christian worship and not taking sufficient account of the fact that we are to yield our bodies to God’s service. There is no doubt from passages such as 1 Corinthians 12:3; Ephesians 2:17-22; Philippians 3:3 that the Holy Spirit facilitates the worship of the new covenant era, but that does not mean that we are compelled to translate λογικὴ λατρεία as ‘spiritual worship’. On the other hand, ‘rational worship’ may only suggest a contrast between the offering of rational beings and the sacrifice of irrational animals. The mind is certainly central to Paul’s perspective here, but the focus is not simply on rationality. The service he calls for is the obedience of faith expressed by those whose minds are being transformed and renewed by God, so that they may no longer be conformed in lifestyle to the values, attitudes and behaviour of ‘this age’ (Rom. 12:2; cf. Col. 3:9-10; Eph. 4:22-4). Consequently, it may be best to read ‘understanding worship’, and to recognise from the context that this means ‘the worship which is consonant with the truth of the gospel’,13 [Cranfield] or the service rendered by those who truly understand the gospel and its implications.

#Romans #quotes #worship #truth

Notes: Inseparable love, Romans 8

Elsewhere it was observed that the first notes in my new Bible were on Romans 8.28-39. They were mere memory ticklers, since I often preach without notes or with just key words. But they might set off some good thoughts for you, so here they are:

  1. Action of God, 28.
  2. Gift of God, 32.
  3. Justification of God, 32-34.
  4. Conquering love of God, 35-39.

In the first part of the chapter, the Holy Spirit appears. In the second half, however, God the Father comes to the fore. The little outline above reflects that.

#god, #romans, #sermon-notes

Joined to another

“So, my brothers and sisters, you also died to the law through the body of Christ, so that you could be joined to another, to the one who was raised from the dead, to bear fruit to God.”

Romans 7.4

Paul disallowed any attempt to use the principle of law for justification before God. Using the death of a spouse as an illustration, he maintained exclusive union with Christ as the way to true spiritual results.

Obedience is a necessity, Rom 6.17, but proving one’s worth to God by law-keeping is of a whole different order. Which are you doing?

#votd #Romans

Father of us all: Romans 4.16-17 VOTD

“For this reason it is by faith so that it may be by grace, with the result that the promise may be certain to all the descendants—not only to those who are under the law, but also to those who have the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all (as it is written, “I have made you the father of many nations”). He is our father in the presence of God whom he believed—the God who makes the dead alive and summons the things that do not yet exist as though they already do.”

Romans 4.16-17

Under the new covenant, God now looks for spiritual descendants of Abraham, who have the same faith he had. He believed in God’s promise, contrary to all evidence.

What yet inexistent realities must Christians believe in as if they already existed?

#faith #promise #Romans #VOTD

The Righteous Requirement of the Law

“For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit” (Romans 8:3-4, ESV)

1. What could the Law of Moses not do? It could not save; it was not designed by God to save (Acts 13:39). The Law of Moses was not designed by God to bridge the gap between man and God. The Law of Moses was designed by God to show the nature of sin (Rom. 3:20) and those guilty of sin will be punished (4:15).

2. However, it is not God’s desire that any perish (2 Peter 3:9)

3. God bridged the gap with His gift to man, His Son (John 3:16); His Son (Jesus) condemned sin in the flesh (Hebrews 2:17-18; 2 Corinthians 5:21).

4. It is my view the righteous requirement of the law is best understood in relation to John 6:44-45 and Galatians 3:24-25, tied in with Paul’s earlier words in Romans 1:17, justification by faith.

5. Justification by faith means one walks in accordance with faith (Romans 10:17; 2 Cor. 5:7) because there is a clear realization of man’s nature, a nature that cannot bridge the gap between himself and God (cf. Romans 7:24-8:1).

#justification, #law, #romans

FULLY CONVINCED

What does it mean to be justified by faith? We know the Bible teaches it, and it might be that we are quick to give a correct answer, but what does it mean? In Romans 4, the apostle Paul gives an illustration to help us understand what it means to be justified by faith. In the previous chapter, Paul made clear that all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God (3:23), and but a little further ahead he states that sin leads to one’s spiritual death (6:23). Sandwiched between these two thoughts is an illustration from the life of Abraham to help us understand what the Holy Spirit wants us to know.

A great many people will tell you that to be justified by faith means to pray what is known as the “sinner’s prayer,” but that is not what Paul said. In fact, what is commonly known as the “sinner’s prayer” is not even found in the Bible, much less did Abraham know anything about it. In Romans 4 we learn that to be justified by faith means do what Abraham did. Let me explain.

Abraham trusted in God. This trust in God was Abraham’s total reliance on God to accept what he offered. What did Abraham offer? His heart. But this was not all that he offered. In Genesis 15, the Lord attributes to Abraham justification because Abraham not only believed (trusted) God, but obeyed Him as well. Twice we learn that Abraham obeyed when he was told by the Lord to do particular things. First, he was told to pick up his family and depart for a land he knew nothing about (Genesis 12). Second, he was told to keep covenant with God by having all the males in his family circumcised (Genesis 17). In both cases, there was nothing easy about that which was required of him. To complicate matters more for Abraham, the Lord promised Abraham that from his wife would come a son. Some had doubts. For Abraham, however, though he may not have understood how such a thing could occur with a woman past the normal time of child-bearing—Abraham was fully convinced and did not waver in unbelief (Romans 4:19-21).

What does it mean to be justified by faith? It means that one fully trusts God and obeys Him in everything He said. Why would anyone want to call Jesus Lord, but then not obey Him (Luke 6:46).

#defiance-disobedience-health-care, #justification, #romans, #salvation

How do you answer the question, ‘Who are you?’

I have been getting a lot of friend requests lately on Facebook from people whose names do not ring a bell. When this happens, one of the first things I do is click on the “About Me” portion of their profile. It is interesting to see what people will say about themselves when given the chance.

Most teenagers, when asked, “Who are you?” will answer with some sport they play or hobby they do. Common answers are, “I am a football player,” “I am a cheerleader” or “I like to draw.” The truth is, we are more than the sum of what we do or are involved in.

Adults do not do any better answering that question. Most identify themselves with their job. They would answer the question with something like “I am lawyer,” “I am a teacher” or “I work at a bank.”

Trying to answer the question is very difficult. Think about it. How would you answer the question, “Who are you?”

Most of us try to identify ourselves with a job or something we’re involved in, but that really does not say all that much about who we are. If that is the only place you look for identity, you will end up disappointed; because, in the long run, our jobs and our hobbies do not matter or last.

In the Bible, God has a lot to say about who we are. In Romans 8 we are told we are God’s children, bought by the blood of Jesus Christ, given the Spirit, and loved so much that nothing can separate us from His love. When we find our identity in those truths, our true identity matters and will last forever.

Luke Bower, Baker Heights church bulletin, Abilene TX

#identity, #romans

Faith Toward God is not Faith Alone

Many teach that sola fide is the ‘end all, be all’ with God and faith, but Hebrews 5:12-6:3 teaches that the important faith to God is the faith that’s only the beginning of people coming to Him. Read 2 Peter 1:3-10 and you’ll find that faith is not the whole flight of stairs to Heaven – it’s only one of the steps that make up the stairs! A vital step for sure, but only one of the vital steps.

Faith toward God is not faith alone. Faith is meant to be a lifestyle – not a one moment decision! Romans 1:16-17 says, “For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ, for it is the power of God to salvation for everyone who believes, for the Jew first and also for the Greek. For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith; as it is written, “The just shall live by faith.”” God’s word plainly says the just shall live by faith, but it never says they will live by just faith!

Because of erroneous teaching many people do not understand what it means to believe/have faith toward God. They read verses like Romans 13:11 and say, ‘See, salvation was brought to Paul and the Romans when they believed and so it can to me too.” But to pretend that ‘believed’ only means a mental/heart acknowledgement (faith alone) is to ignore what Paul and the Roman Christians did to accept the gift of eternal life through Jesus Christ (Romans 6:23). They all heard the word of God (Romans 10:17), they all repented of their sins (Romans 2:4), they all confessed the faith in their hearts (Romans 10:6-11) and they all were baptized for the remission of their sins (Romans 6:1-4). Did you notice all the scripture references came from the same source – the Romans (along with Paul) who ‘believed‘ back in Romans 13:11 did more than “just believe.”

Faith toward God is powerful and wonderful, but faith alone falls short of both!

#faith, #faith-alone, #justification-by-faith, #milk-of-the-word, #romans, #salvation