That's what I meant to sing

You’ve probably seen lists like this before, but here are few song titles that have been rearranged to reflect what some people mean to say while they sing during the worship services:

  • Oh, How I Like Jesus
  • It is Fairly Well with My Soul
  • Just as I Pretend to Be
  • Sit Down, Sit Down for Jesus
  • I Need Thee Every Other Hour

Unbelief is alive and well, and even our singing can reveal it. High-mindedness is not the answer because the unbelief can get any of us (1 Corinthians 10:12-13). So honest examination is key; and drawing closer to God helps to get rid of the duplicitous and even hypocritical song notes that are echoed off the walls (James 4:8). If out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks (Matthew 12:34) then how much more so does this truth apply to our singing?

Let us consider our desires, our life and the words of the songs that we sing lest we become the one who sings the stanzas on the page instead of the stanzas in our heart.

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#self-examination, #singing, #songs

Be a man and answer God

Job experienced an extended time of suffering. He asked God why he was in such misery. His friends said he was guilty of sin. He protested and maintained the fact that he was innocent. Job desired an audience with God so he could speak to Him about struggles. Job stood defiantly before God and sought an audience to plead his case. He demanded a judicial hearing but got far more than he expected. “Oh that one would hear me! behold, my desire is, that the Almighty would answer me, and that mine adversary had written a book.” (Job 31:35) He said, “Surely I would speak to the Almighty, and I desire to reason with God.” (Job 13:3) We may ask for something that we do not really want when we get it. Job was given an opportunity to face God but it was not at all what he expected. Speaking from a whirlwind God said to Job, “Gird up thy loins now like a man: I will demand of thee, and declare thou unto me. Wilt thou also disannul my judgment? wilt thou condemn me, that thou mayest be righteous? Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him?” (Job 40:6-9) Job was overwhelmed and humbled. He admitted his own unworthiness and inability to answer.

We might likewise be very humbled if God questioned us. What might God ask us in our hearing before Him?

God might ask us, “Who are you who teach everything but the truth?” God asked Job, “Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge?” (Job 38:2) God doth not charge Job, as his three friends had done, with hypocrisy and living a sinful life. He charged Job concerning his words. He spoke words without knowledge. His words proceeded from ignorance. God could easily say the same thing about all the false teaching of our day. Peter wrote, “But there were false prophets also among the people, even as there shall be false teachers among you, who privily shall bring in damnable heresies, even denying the Lord that bought them, and bring upon themselves swift destruction.” (2 Peter 2:1) There are many false teachers in this Christian age. They subvert both truth and holiness and bringing upon themselves swift destruction. The sad thing about false teachers is that, “Many shall follow their pernicious ways; by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spoken of.” (2 Peter 2:2) God might ask us, “Who are you who teach everything but the truth?” Continue reading

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