Take the prophets: James 5.10 VOTD

“As an example of suffering and patience, brothers and sisters, take the prophets who spoke in the Lord’s name.”

James 5.10

James points to the need for patience until the Lord’s return. He mentions the OT prophets as examples. They spoke God’s word of repentance to Israel for years under most trying circumstances.

Christ’s people also speak in his name and face suffering because of it. What other parallels with the prophets can be made?

#patience #suffering #VOTD

Those feelings of loneliness

Do you ever feel alone? When we feel that way, we’re probably not really alone. Feelings don’t do a good job of reflecting reality. They’re a result of our interpretation of events and situations. Since our views of reality are often skewed, our feelings seldom reflect what’s really happening.

But let’s say, for sake of argument, that there are times when we’re really alone. Isolated. Estranged. Closed off from people. What would that be like? How would we really feel? Continue reading

#corollaries, #learning, #loneliness, #relationships, #suffering

‘The granddaddy of all laments:’ Psalm 88

By Sean Ashberry

The Bible is not casual about evil and suffering. The Bible in fact is brutally honest about pain, misfortune, and the challenge it presents to faith. The fact of suffering continues to stand as one of the greatest challenges to the Christian faith. Its distribution and degree seems random and unfair. People have always asked how one might reconcile this reality with God’s justice and his love. Those are fair questions. Continue reading

#prayer, #psalms, #suffering

The ‘passion’ of the Christian

Word has it Mel Gibson wants to follow up his movie on “The Passion of Christ” with a film on his resurrection. But a film that nobody will make is one about the passion of the Christian—passion in this phrase meaning “suffering.”

I’m doing a series in the Urbanova congregation on Sundays about the pains of the disciple of Christ. They include the pains of growth, service, persecution, God’s discipline, and Christ’s suffering.

These pains do not overwhelm the joys in Christ nor the peace of God. But they are real and ought to be shared ahead of time with those who are considering discipleship of Christ. Let there be no surprises upon becoming a Christian.

Jesus was, after all, the Suffering Servant, and his followers will be as well.

#suffering

Is the book of Job about forgiveness?

shards-job

Sometimes I wonder if the book of Job is not so much about the man after whom the book is named, as it is about his friends. Or about his discussions with his friends as he maintains his integrity and defends a proper vision of God, although he himself is in the midst of intense struggle and suffering.

Yes, you’ll probably accuse me of making even the book of Job into a book about evangelism. And you will not be far from making a just accusation.

The lessons of the book are many for those who seek to influence others for Christ: Continue reading

#book-of-job, #divine-sovereignty, #evangelism, #suffering

Why the suffering?

Did God’s plan of redemption make Jesus suffer, or did it know that he would?

Is it one or the other, or is it both?

From the prophecies of old to the sweat soaked prayer in the garden, aspects of each avenue can be seen.

Regardless of the answer to the above question(s), Jesus chose to suffer for us. He chose to lay down his life so we could have our life (John 10:15-18).

Some stumble in the face of such questions while others grow closer to God through it. But how should we react according to the suffering servant himself?

Then He said to them, “O foolish ones, and slow of heart to believe in all that the prophets have spoken! Ought not the Christ to have suffered these things and to enter into His glory?” And beginning at Moses and all the Prophets, He expounded to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself.” (Luke 24:25-27)

#life-questions, #questions-and-doubts, #suffering

Reminder about the Apologetics Press 2014 Debate

Please keep this upcoming event in your prayers:

AP Web Logo

Tickets Available for Kyle Butt/Bart Erhman Debate
The Christian Student Center of the University of North Alabama will be  hosting a debate between Apologetics Press author Kyle Butt and University of North Carolina professor Bart Ehrman. Professor Bart Ehrman has written more than 20 books, including the New York Times bestsellers Misquoting Jesus, Jesus Interrupted, and God’s Problem.  He is the James A. Gray Distinguished Professor of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He is a self-avowed  agnostic who claims that the pain and suffering he sees in the world make it impossible for him to believe that the Christian God exists.  Thus, the debate will be on the subject of suffering and the existence of God. Ehrman will be affirming: “The pain and suffering in the world indicate that the Christian God does not exist.” Kyle will be denying  that proposition.

#agnosticism, #apologetics-press, #debate, #god, #suffering