Why is worry a problem for so many people?

Lesson 5 of the Gospel Advocate’s “Foundations” study book (Fall 2017, Preaching and Ministry) covered Jesus’ lesson on “worry” from Matthew 6:25-34.

In the discussion question section, “Why is worry a problem for so many people?” was asked.

Our class didn’t make it to that question, but here are my thoughts. Continue reading

#questions-and-answers, #teachings-of-jesus, #worry

And the common people heard him gladly

Then Jesus answered and said, while He taught in the temple, “How is it that the scribes say that the Christ is the Son of David? For David himself said by the Holy Spirit: ‘The Lord said to my Lord, “Sit at My right hand, Till I make Your enemies Your footstool.”’ Therefore David himself calls Him ‘Lord’; how is He then his Son?” And the common people heard Him gladly.” (Mark 12:35-37)

Why did the common people make up the majority of Jesus’ eager students?

Was it because of the preconceived notions that some had about the Messiah?

Was it because of the topics that Jesus preached on?

Was it because of the miracles that Jesus performed?

Was it because Jesus had made a mockery of the religious leaders of the day?

Or was it because the “common” people were made up of individuals who had a desire to be a sheep with the shepherd more than being a shepherd with the sheep?

Just a thought.

#common-people, #leadership, #teachings-of-jesus

Why some people see contradictions in the scriptures (context)

Many people accuse the scriptures of contradicting themselves; some even seem to make a sport of it.

But why are so many so quick to make such an accusation? There are several reasons, but one big one is because they read something like this:

“Therefore whoever hears these sayings of Mine, and does them, I will liken him to a wise man who built his house on the rock: and the rain descended, the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house; and it did not fall, for it was founded on the rock. “But everyone who hears these sayings of Mine, and does not do them, will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand: and the rain descended, the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house; and it fell. And great was its fall.” (Matthew 7:24-27)

and then they read something like this:

Whoever comes to Me, and hears My sayings and does them, I will show you whom he is like: He is like a man building a house, who dug deep and laid the foundation on the rock. And when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently against that house, and could not shake it, for it was founded on the rock. But he who heard and did nothing is like a man who built a house on the earth without a foundation, against which the stream beat vehemently; and immediately it fell. And the ruin of that house was great.”” (Luke 6:47-49)

and then their conclusion becomes that the scriptures contradict because the lesson given by Jesus in Matthew’s account doesn’t match the lesson verbatim given by Jesus in Luke’s account.

Unfortunately, many people who make this accusation never to stop think and realize that Matthew’s and Luke’s account are dealing with two different situations at two completely different times. And the point behind this isn’t hard to understand. I mean, have you ever told a story (a parable in the above setting) to different people at different times to get the same point across? It’s not the telling of the story verbatim that matters, it’s the point that you’re trying to make to them with it. Thus it is many times with the teachings of Jesus in the scriptures that many people see a contradiction when they should be looking at the context of when and where and why it was said.

Then Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people.” (Matthew 9:35)

#bible-contradictions, #context, #teachings-of-jesus