Understanding the Internet for mission

Facebook now includes icons for homosexual and lesbian couples in its relationship options. Some brethren are abandoning the service because of it. Apparently, they consider their presence on the service as crossing the line between being in the world and being of it, or approving of it. I invited one of them to TFR.

• Facebook seems to have become a more visual medium of late. More people post images, photos, and graphics. At least, my “friends” do. What about yours? Not sure why this trend has taken off. Maybe from influence from Pinterest. Or a general preference in our age for images over text, started in the 20th Century by television. A hard challenge for the gospel, this trend. (Remember our first step to salvation: hear?)

• Twitter is tightening up third-party access to its service, certainly within its right, but raising the wall to protect its proprietary model. Most recently, it has cut off LinkedIn.com from posting to its service. I like Friendica‘s approach: the Internet is our social media. Remains to be seen if commercialism will allow such ideas any elbow room. (Find me at randal@myfriendica.net.)

• Meanwhile, Google continues to skew search results, most recently by muzzling firearms retailers. They’re making it harder for you to find a gun online. Of course, this is not their first foray into socio-political filters. I’ve pretty well abandoned it for other good services like Duck Duck Go and StartPage.com. Remember: you got options.

• All of this is background for serving the Lord on the Internet. Where are the trends? In what direction are developments moving? How can Christians be effective on the web? Those who strive to tame the Internet beast for evangelism and edification want to have a bit of understanding of how it works. A tall task, but part of it.

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#facebook, #google, #internet-ministry, #twitter